Friday, September 6, 2013

Korean Hyssop: Herbal Benefits In The Southern Garden

Korean Hyssop (Agastache Rugosa)

This amazing herb has a few other nicknames it goes by. Some of them are Korean Mint, Hummingbird Mint, Indian Mint, Blue Licorice, Purple Giant Hyssop, Huo Xiang and Wrinkled Giant Hyssop. 

My Korean Hyssop got lost under a patch of Bermuda Grass for a bit. How amazingly hardy it is! No watering went on in this part of the garden either, and we are in serious drought here.

As the hyssop broke out in tall spikes of purple blooms it was non-stop visited by pollinators. The most popular being the bumblebees.

I planted my fall pattypan squash in nearby raised beds. As the squash began blooming I found the flowers constantly loaded with bumblebees. Many of the blooms had two bees inside!


With all of the pollinating going on in the squash, one can just about bet on an abundant squash harvest this fall.

I started the Korean Hyssop from seeds in early spring. I have to say I'm quite excited about this herb. For one, it is a perennial, so I can count on it coming back every year.

The herb has a blissful scent of sweet minty licorice. The fragrance  got me thinking about making a cup of tea so I decided to check out its health benefits.

The herb is one of the 50 fundamental medicinal herbs used in Chinese Herbology. I counted at least 10 different chemical compounds that exist in this herb.

It has traditionally been used for treating anxiety, nausea, bacterial infections, or gas.

It is often used as a flavoring in stew and pancakes. Hmmm...pancakes? That sounds interesting! I think I'll start with tea.

RECIPE
A delightful blend to try for Hyssop tea 
4 parts Licorice Mint
1 part Cinnamon
1 part Vanilla Bean
1 part Cloves

I grow the herb Patchouli as well. I love the smell and it is a herb used mainly for perfumes. The Korean Hyssop (also nicknamed "Patchouli Mint") is used for making perfumes too. I have plans to experiment with some of my own. I'll let you know how they turn out.



Happy Gardening!

Pammy

2 comments:

  1. Ooh - I will have to find out if this grows wild here in Korea! It would be fun to find some on a mountain path on vacation!

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    1. If you do please share a photo Aadel! You've got to be having the time of your life getting to experience so many new and wonderful things!! xox

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